Archive for the ‘Politics & Economics’ Category

23 Feb
2011

Puede una dosis de mercado salvar a la Revolucion cubana?

Ni siquiera después de 52 años del triunfo de la Revolución, Cuba ha logrado hacer funcionar su economía planificada y dirigida centralmente. Los servicios sociales, alguna vez el orgullo de la Revolución, ya no son costeables y empeoran visiblemente. Entretanto, con la ineficiencia de la economía se corre el riesgo de que se produzca un progresivo distanciamiento entre el gobierno y el pueblo. La miseria está minando el pacto político que logró sostener al país durante décadas y lo fortaleció políticamente: ese pacto posrevolucionario entre la elite y el pueblo, que otorgaba lealtad política a cambio de independencia nacional, protección social y eliminación de la pobreza. Hoy está muriendo lentamente la generación que hizo la revolución y se benefició de ella. Y a la generación joven la actual economía planificada improductiva no le ofrece perspectivas de trabajo ni de consumo

6 Aug
2010

Efectos Políticos de la Crisis Económica en Sur América

La actual crisis económica, no ha tenido el mismo efecto devastador tanto económico y financiero que tuvieron las crisis anteriores en sur América, sin embargo, en el área política, estos efectos pueden ser profundos y pueden afectar la integración regional, contribuir a la polarización política, e imponer mayores demandas sobre el estado. Si estos efectos se cristalizan, la región tendrá dificultad en reducir los niveles de pobreza, y se sumirá a una posible ola de inestabilidad social y política.

20 Jul
2010

The Negative Effects of Globalization in Latin America

Since the 1980s, globalization has changed drastically both negatively and positively the life of millions of people around the world, and Latin America has not escaped this change. Globalization is not new, it “can be traced back at least to the 15th century, with the genesis of the capital world economy and the geographic expansion of division of labor, access to raw materials, industrial production, and the circulation of capital.”[1] However, in the last 30 years, the process of globalization has increased in an unprecedented speed, and today, it involves so many reforms that simply some governments are unable to adjust themselves to these policies, and as a result governments see their sovereignty and power vanish away.

20 Jul
2010

Ecuador-Peru Boundary Dispute: Liberal and Realist Explanation

The boundary dispute between Ecuador and Peru has been a painful experience that nationals from both countries have had to endure. “The dispute is not only one of the major international issues of Latin America, but it is also dangerous, because it’s long history has clothed it with considerations of national prestige and honor and because it involves a very considerable extent of territory with which neither country is willing to depart.”[1] The boundary disputes between these two countries can be traced back to colonial days and are due largely to the uncertainty as to the limits of colonial territorial divisions.

20 Jul
2010

NAFTA: Regional Trade Agreement and the Creation of International Law

The international law created under NAFTA is a complex set of rules and norms that binds three countries together; Mexico, the United States, and Canada. The aim of this agreement is to: first, eliminate barriers to trade and facilitate the cross-border movement of goods and services among the parties. Second, promote conditions of fair competition. Third, increase investment opportunities. Fourth, provide adequate and effective protection and enforcement of intellectual property rights. Fifth, create effective procedures for the implementation and application of the agreements, and sixth, establish a framework for trilateral, regional, and multilateral cooperation to expand and enhance the benefits of the agreement.

20 Jul
2010

International Relations: Realism, Liberalism, and Constructivism

International relations is a complex subject that attempts to study political, social, and economic interactions among independent sovereign states. The complexity of the subject is attributed to the differences that exist between and among each state and to the anarchical international system. In an attempt to better understand how sovereign states interact with one another different approaches have been developed. But these approaches do not have a universal view of the basic elements necessary to study international relations like, the state, the individual, and the structure of the international system.

20 Jul
2010

James Madison

James Madison was the fourth President of the United States, and one of the country’s founding fathers. Since he was the primary author of the Constitution, he is often referred to as the “Father of the Constitution.” He wrote over a third of the Federalist Papers, which were the most influential writings on the Constitution. He helped draft many of the basic laws of the United States, and was responsible for the first ten amendments to the Constitution. For this reason, he is also known as the “Father of the Bill of Rights.” Since Madison played such an important role in the formation of the United States, his views were very influential in forming the basic ideas about the ideal political leadership and government of the country. At the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia in 1787, Madison drafted the Virginia Plan, which laid out his revolutionary idea for a three-branch federal system which became the basis for the Constitution that is still in effect today. Madison advocated a strong federal government that could overrule actions and decisions of individual states when necessary. He was a very strong advocate of a government that would use a system of checks and balances to limit the powers of factions, or special interest groups.

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