Archive for July, 2010

20 Jul
2010

I See

Tonight, right before entering this building, I closed my eyes in an attempt to bring back all the wonderful memories that I have of this place: this school that gave me the opportunity to grow, this school where professors and classmates became my close friends, this school that opened so many doors for me, this school that gave me the security and confidence to go on, to try something new, and to challenge myself once again.

20 Jul
2010

You Can Do It

On May 28th, 2001, as I was about to get on the bus a sad woman came to me, she said, we have been together for more than twenty years, we have fought together against poverty, we have tried everything but our efforts are not enough to keep you from going away.

20 Jul
2010

Let College Be Your Next Step

The memories of the darkest day in my life cannot be erased from my mind. It was on March 24, 2001 that I was forced to leave Ecuador. It was on this day that I witnessed my family fall apart. First, my two nephews who were four and six years old were ordered to walk away from me and their mother who is my oldest sister. Then, a sad woman with tears rolling down her cheeks approached me, and without a single word her shaking hand managed to express her religious belief by doing the sign of the cross over my chest. Knowing that destiny was separating us, I nodded in sign of accepting her farewell.

20 Jul
2010

My Last Fight

Poverty forced me into this fight when I was a child. When I was growing up in my dreams I saw a big fight, but I didn’t know when it will come. When I was young and when poverty pushed me out of my beloved country I knew that the fight had just begun. Eight years later; after several times risking my life, after countless challenges, after overcoming so many obstacles, now that I can raise my head with dignity after so many humiliations I feel nothing but sympathy for those who don’t want me here, I feel that the moment has come, and I feel that finally the final round has arrived. I will win this time.

20 Jul
2010

Do Not Give Up Now

I am aware that you my friends from the media have done little or nothing to help us. I read your papers. I heard your voice. I watched your images. You have done little or nothing to help us. When there is a crime, when there is blood, you have time to cover that story. But when an immigrant learns English despite his limited time, when an immigrant goes to school and excels in it despite his legal status, and when an immigrant started washing dishes and his determination moved him away from there and now he is ready to work for a corporation you don’t have time to depict those stories. When an immigrant moves on despite all his challenges you my friends do not have eyes to see that, you do not have ears to hear that, you do not have hands to write about that, and you do not have a voice to talk about that.

20 Jul
2010

Unwanted Journey

The memories of the darkest day in my life cannot be erased from my mind. It was on March 24, 2001 that I was forced to leave Ecuador. It was in this day that I witnessed my family fall apart. First, my two nephews who were four and six years old were ordered to walk away from me and their mother who is my oldest sister. Then a sad woman with tears rolling down her cheeks approached me and without a single word her shaking hand managed to express her religious belief by doing the sing of the cross over my chest. Knowing that our destiny was separating us I nodded in sign of accepting her farewell.

20 Jul
2010

I Believe

I believe that an immigrant has two responsibilities:

Contribute to the betterment of the country where he lives

And help to improve the country that he left.

20 Jul
2010

I Promise

I promise to look ahead, to picture you accomplishing your dreams, to look up and see you in the hill’s top, and to hear your voice and the sounds of victory.

20 Jul
2010

The Dialogue

Polarization is your last concern, but Karen, be honest with me and look into my eyes when you respond to my questions. Did you really think that there was unity in Bolivia when the indigenous people have been oppressed and discriminated for 513 years? Do you think that unity in Mexico helped the Revolutionary Institutional Party (PRI) hold power for 70 years? Do you think that the Samoza government in Nicaragua held power for so long because there was unity in the nation? Karen, my dear friend, do you really believe that the Isaias family in Ecuador who owned more than 100 companies have been uniting the country? Do you think that in Ecuador we had 19 constitutions because unity allowed us to understand each other? Do you believe that the former owner of Radio Caracas Television (RCTV), or the owner of Venevision, Gustavo Cisneros has the same interests that you and I do? Based on their interests, what do you think; have they been polarizing or uniting the Venezuelans?

20 Jul
2010

Christina’s World

Andrew Wyeth was born in Chadds Ford, Pennsylvania on July 12, 1917. As a child, Wyeth suffered from various health problems, and because of this he was tutored at home rather than being sent to school. His father was the great artist and illustrator N.C. Wyeth. N.C. Wyeth was known as a master draftsman, who was particularly gifted at drawing the human form. From the time they were born, N.C. Wyeth taught all of his children how to draw. N.C. Wyeth had learned a great deal of his own craft from another great American illustrator, Howard Pyle. Howard Pyle was considered one of the country’s greatest illustrators and also “the most important American teacher of that art.”[2] Pyle’s style greatly influenced both N.C. Wyeth and his son Andrew Wyeth. N.C. Wyeth was famous for illustrating classic books such as Treasure Island, Kidnapped, Robinson Crusoe, Robin Hood, and Last of the Mohicans.[3] N. C. Wyeth took his son Andrew as his apprentice when he was only fifteen years of age.[4] N.C. Wyeth had unique ideas about painting. He felt that to really paint a subject, the artist needed to know the subject “even more than intimately, he has got to know it spiritually.” For this reason, Wyeth would spend a great deal of time with his subjects, getting to know them well.[5] Andrew Wyeth was such a good student that he was able to have his first show at the Art Alliance in Philadelphia when he was only nineteen years old. He had his first one-man show of watercolors when he was twenty.

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